Entomological Etymology – Correction

ENTOMOLOGICAL ETYMOLOGY

CORRECTION
By Kevin Scott

In the last issue of The Reptile Times, the spiders belonging to the genus Poecilotheria were erroneously referred to as ornamental baboon spiders. Baboon spiders belong to Harpactirinae, a subfamily of Theraphosidae(tarantulas) from Africa. This subfamily was first set up by Reginald Pocock in 1897 to include species in the genera Ceratogyrus and Pterinochilus [1].  The accepted common name for the Poecilotheria genus is simply “ornamental spiders,” excluding the word ‘baboon.’ The scientific names used in the last issue were correct as of the date published.correction

NOMENCLATURE

In the world of invertebrates, it is particularly important to use correct nomenclature in order to avoid uncertainty with respect to a species’ identity. Stanley and Marguerite Schultz claim that the nomenclature of tarantulas “can euphemistically be described as confused,” in their book The Tarantula Keeper’s Guide. Much of the confusion stems from misidentification during importation as well as the misuse and misspelling of names. I generally prefer to use the scientific names of spiders to avoid confusion, but even so, there can be some uncertainty in terms of the most common revision of classification.

COMMON DESCRIPTORS

One problem with common names is that they are often descriptive, and could in principle apply to several species. For example, Nhandu coloratovillosum is commonly referred to as the Brazilian black and white tarantula. Acanthoscurria geniculata is also a tarantula from Brazil that has black and white coloration, but the common name for this one is Brazilian giant white knee. Furthermore, although these two species are far from identical in appearance, to someone with little or no knowledge about tarantulas, they can appear similar to one another, especially as spiderlings.FINAL NOTES

In all fields of science, nothing is 100% exact, and taxonomy is good example of this [2]. Scientists often argue about the classification about species and whole genera are taken apart and reassembled based on new information all the time. Advances in genetic analysis allow us to take a closer look at the relationship between life forms, often with surprising results. Because we live in a world where things are constantly changing, where ranges of inhabitance overlap, and where interspecies breeding can occur, the field of taxonomy will probably continue to change indefinitely. In addition, even within a species differences in physiology can be seen. With a conscious effort to use correct nomenclature we can all remove a portion of the error, at least where science and hobby overlap.

[1] For more information on baboon spider taxonomy and descriptions, see www.BaboonSpiders.de

[2] For more information see Robson, G. C. (1928). The Species Problem: an Introduction to the Study of Evolutionary Divergence in Natural Populations. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s